Clothing and bedding and its relevance to sudden infant death syndrome: Further results from the New Zealand Cot Death Study

@article{Wilson1994ClothingAB,
  title={Clothing and bedding and its relevance to sudden infant death syndrome: Further results from the New Zealand Cot Death Study},
  author={C. A. Wilson and Barry J Taylor and Robert Malcolm. Laing and S. M. Williams and Edwin A. Mitchell},
  journal={Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health},
  year={1994},
  volume={30}
}
As part of a large nationwide case‐control study covering a region with 78% of all births in New Zealand during 1987–90, the clothing and bedding of infants dying of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and that of an appropriate control group were recorded. Cases consisted of 81% (n= 393) of all cases of SIDS in the study area and 88.4% (n= 1592) of 1800 control infants randomly selected from the hospital births and who completed a home interview. 
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Insulation from Bedding and Clothing and its Effect Modifiers
TLDR
More thermal insulation than was necessary to maintain the lower critical temperature increased the risk of SIDS primarily among infants in the prone sleep position, and to a lesser degree in infants whose mothers smoked and in infants who were unwell.
Sheepskin bedding and the sudden infant death syndrome. New Zealand Cot Death Study Group.
TLDR
It is concluded that if an infant needs to be placed prone to sleep for medical reasons, a sheepskin should not be used as underbedding, however, for infants placed supine to sleep, sheepskins are not associated with an increased risk of SIDS.
Head Covering and the Risk for SIDS: Findings From the New Zealand and German SIDS Case-Control Studies
TLDR
The finding that sudden infant death syndrome cases in which infants were found with their heads covered were often very sweaty suggests that head covering was not an agonal event and that it preceded the death and may have been causally related to the death.
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TLDR
The epidemiological evidence does not fully support postulated causal mechanisms such as hypoxia, hypercapnoea and thermal stress, but neither does it support the idea that head covering is part of some terminal struggle.
Association between use of a quilt and sudden infant death syndrome: case-control study
TLDR
How the association between the use of a quilt and the syndrome depends on sleep position is reported, and an adverse effect of quilt use was evident in infants who did not sleep prone but not in infant who slept prone.
Review Article Reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome: A review of the scientific literature
TLDR
Strong evidence has now accumulated that the intervention campaigns to reduce prone sleeping during infancy have been followed by SIDS rate declines and recent data indicate that the supine position is not associated with an increase in significant morbidity outcomes and provides greater protection for SIDS than the side position, which may be unstable.
Use of duvets and the risk of sudden infant death syndrome
TLDR
This study does not support the recommendation to avoid duvets, and subgroup analysis did not identify any group in which the use of duvetts was associated with an increased risk of SIDS.
Sudden infant death syndrome in 2000.
TLDR
SIDS comprises about 80% of all sudden unexpected deaths in infancy (SUDI), but a thorough postmortem examination is required to exclude undiagnosed natural causes of SUDI, such as infection, meningitis, congenital anomalies, and metabolic diseases (eg, medium chain fatty acid disorders).
Risk and preventive factors for cot death in The Netherlands, a low-incidence country
TLDR
Placing an infant prone or on side on last occasion, secondary prone position (not placed prone but turned to prone), inexperienced prone sleeping and use of a duvet, leading to head and body being covered, were shown to be risk factors.
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome from Epidemiology to Pathophysiology: Exploring the Connections
TLDR
To understand how various factors contribute to SIDS deaths, the characteristics of sleeping infants in two different populations, in future SIDS victims and in healthy infants exposed to conditions known to favor SIDS are studied.
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