Clothing Stories: Consumption, Identity, and Desire in Depression-Era Toronto

@article{Srigley2007ClothingSC,
  title={Clothing Stories: Consumption, Identity, and Desire in Depression-Era Toronto},
  author={Katrina Srigley},
  journal={Journal of Women's History},
  year={2007},
  volume={19},
  pages={104 - 82}
}
Using oral histories, this article explores the consumption stories of a diverse group of workingwomen who lived in Toronto during the Depression. At this difficult time, when men were struggling with exceptionally high rates of unemployment, young women often became family breadwinners. In these positions, they had to balance their desires for clothing with their economic situations, as apparel operated as both a strong indicator of their status, or desired status, and a tool for finding and… Expand

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