Clostridium difficile: Responding to a New Threat From an Old Enemy

@article{McDonald2005ClostridiumDR,
  title={Clostridium difficile: Responding to a New Threat From an Old Enemy},
  author={L. McDonald},
  journal={Infection Control \&\#x0026; Hospital Epidemiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={26},
  pages={672 - 675}
}
  • L. McDonald
  • Published 2005
  • Medicine
  • Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
(CDC) recently described a novel strain of C. difficile that possesses both unique putative virulence factors and increased resistance to the fluoroquinolones; either may provide this strain with selective advantages over other strains.' This strain was associated with CDAD outbreaks in seven hospitals in six states (Georgia, Illinois, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, and Pennsylvania) with onset dates during 2001 to 2004. Since this report, we have identified outbreaks of this strain in four… Expand

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