Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermenters in earthworm gut content

@article{Wst2011ClostridiaceaeAE,
  title={Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermenters in earthworm gut content},
  author={Pia K. W{\"u}st and Marcus A. Horn and Harold L Drake},
  journal={The ISME Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={5},
  pages={92-106}
}
The earthworm gut provides ideal in situ conditions for ingested heterotrophic soil bacteria capable of anaerobiosis. High amounts of mucus- and plant-derived saccharides such as glucose are abundant in the earthworm alimentary canal, and high concentrations of molecular hydrogen (H2) and organic acids in the alimentary canal are indicative of ongoing fermentations. Thus, the central objective of this study was to resolve potential links between fermentations and active fermenters in gut… Expand
Differential Engagement of Fermentative Taxa in Gut Contents of the Earthworm Lumbricus terrestris
TLDR
The results reinforce the likelihood that different saccharides stimulate different fermentations in gut contents of the earthworm and facultative aerobes related to Aeromonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae can be important drivers of these fermentations. Expand
Methanogenic food web in the gut contents of methane-emitting earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil
TLDR
RNA-based stable isotope probing of bacterial 16S rRNA as well as mcrA and mrtA (the alpha subunit of methyl-CoM reductase and its isoenzyme), and acetogens related to Peptostreptoccocaceae were likewise found to be participants in the methanogenic food web. Expand
Protein- and RNA-Enhanced Fermentation by Gut Microbiota of the Earthworm Lumbricus terrestris
TLDR
The capacity of gut-associated obligate anaerobes and facultative aerobes to catalyze biopolymer-driven fermentations are demonstrated and the potential importance of protein and RNA as substrates linked to the overall turnover dynamics of organic carbon in the alimentary canal of the earthworm is highlighted. Expand
Dietary polysaccharides: fermentation potentials of a primitive gut ecosystem
TLDR
It is suggested that hydrolysis of certain ingested structural polysaccharides may be a limiting factor in the ability of gut fermenters to utilize them and nonstructural poly Saccharides of disrupted biomass are subject to rapid fermentation by gut microbes and yield fatty acids that can be utilized by the earthworm. Expand
Impact of water content and dietary organic carbon richness on gut bacteria in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris
TLDR
Findings illustrate that functionally redundant ingested bacteria and earthworm-associated Tenericutes might be influenced by nutrient fluctuations in the gut and organic carbon richness of the earthworm diet. Expand
Isolation and characterization of aerobic microorganisms with cellulolytic activity in the gut of endogeic earthworms.
TLDR
It is suggested that earthworms digest lignocellulose by exploiting microbial exocellULase and xylanase besides their own endo cellulaseBesides the findings suggest that earthworm digestion is influenced by anaerobic microorganisms. Expand
Fermenters in the earthworm gut: do transients matter?
TLDR
Findings indicated that detectable differences between the fermentative taxa in soil and gut contents are due in part to the nutrient‐dependent metabolic status of community members and reinforce the likelihood that ingested transient microbes contribute to fermentation in the alimentary canal. Expand
Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts Indicative of Active Facultative Aerobes and Obligate Anaerobes in Earthworm Gut Contents
TLDR
The collective results suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal and demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworms gut content. Expand
Characterization of the bacterial communities of casts from Eisenia andrei fed with different substrates
TLDR
It was found that the bacterial communities of cast strongly depended on the food source ingested by earthworms; although, no differences in α-diversity were detected. Expand
In Vivo Pyro-SIP Assessing Active Gut Microbiota of the Cotton Leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis
TLDR
This pilot study establishes the first in-depth inventory of the gut microbiota of a model organism from the mostly phytophagous Lepidoptera, and shows that Pyro-SIP can rapidly gain insight into the Gut microbiota's metabolic activity with high resolution and high precision. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 99 REFERENCES
N2O-Producing Microorganisms in the Gut of the Earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa Are Indicative of Ingested Soil Bacteria
TLDR
The results of this study suggest that most of the N2O emitted by earthworms is due to the activation of ingested denitrifiers and other nitrate-dissimilating bacteria in the gut lumen. Expand
Anaerobic Consumers of Monosaccharides in a Moderately Acidic Fen
TLDR
The collective findings of this study indicate that fen soils harbor diverse, acid-tolerant, and novel xylose- utilizing as well as glucose-utilizing facultative aerobes and obligate anaerobes that form trophic links to novel moderately acid-Tolerant methanogens. Expand
Metabolic responses of novel cellulolytic and saccharolytic agricultural soil Bacteria to oxygen.
TLDR
A large uncultured diversity of soil Bacteria was involved in the utilization of cellulose and products of its hydrolysis, and oxygen availability impacted differentially on the activity of taxa and different redox guilds (e.g. fermenters and iron reducers) compete or interact during cellulose degradation in aerated soils. Expand
In Situ Hydrogen and Nitrous Oxide as Indicators of Concomitant Fermentation and Denitrification in the Alimentary Canal of the Earthworm Lumbricus terrestris
TLDR
The findings suggest that earthworms contribute to the terrestrial cycling of carbon and nitrogen via anaerobic microbial activities in the alimentary canal and constitute a mobile source of reductant for microbiota in aerated soils. Expand
Culturable microorganisms from the earthworm digestive tract
TLDR
Investigation of the functional characteristics and role in the host organism is required to confirm the symbiotic status of the microorganisms associated with the earthworm digestive tract. Expand
Enterobacteriaceae facilitate the anaerobic degradation of glucose by a forest soil.
TLDR
Results indicate that facultative aerobes, in particular Enterobacteriaceae, can outcompete obligate anaerobes when conditions become anoxic in forest soils and may be involved in the initial decomposition of monosaccharides in anoxic micro zones of aerated forest soils. Expand
The Earthworm Gut: an Ideal Habitat for Ingested N2O-Producing Microorganisms
TLDR
The hypothesis that the in situ conditions of the earthworm gut activate ingested N2O-producing soil bacteria during gut passage is supported, and a combination of supplements yielded rates greater than that obtained mathematically for single supplements, suggesting that the maximum rates observed were due to synergistic effects of supplements. Expand
Denitrifying Bacteria in the Earthworm Gastrointestinal Tract and In Vivo Emission of Nitrous Oxide (N(inf2)O) by Earthworms
TLDR
Earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Octolasium lacteum) and gut homogenates and methanogens were not readily culturable from gut material, and N(inf2)O emission was stimulated by acetylene and under aerobic conditions. Expand
As the worm turns: the earthworm gut as a transient habitat for soil microbial biomes.
TLDR
The gut of the earthworm constitutes a mobile anoxic microzone to which the microorganisms of aerated soils are subjected, and the impact that soil macrofauna might have on terrestrial nitrogen cycle processes via their transient hosting of ingested prokaryotes is illustrated. Expand
Identification of uncultured bacteria tightly associated with the intestine of the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus (Lumbricidae; Oligochaeta)
TLDR
The results suggested that the microbial community tightly associated with the intestine was dominated by a small number of phylotypes and that this association was opportunistic rather than obligate. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...