Clonality disguises the vulnerability of a threatened arid zone Acacia

@article{Roberts2017ClonalityDT,
  title={Clonality disguises the vulnerability of a threatened arid zone Acacia},
  author={David G. Roberts and Cairo N. Forrest and Andrew J. Denham and David J. Ayre},
  journal={Ecology and Evolution},
  year={2017},
  volume={7},
  pages={9451 - 9460}
}
Abstract Long‐lived, widespread plant species are expected to be genetically diverse, reflecting the interaction between large population sizes, overlapping generations, and gene flow. Such species are thought to be resilient to disturbance, but may carry an extinction debt due to reproductive failure. Genetic studies of Australian arid zone plant species suggest an unusually high frequency of asexuality, polyploidy, or both. A preliminary AFLP genetic study implied that the naturally… 
Reproduction of threatened, long lived semi arid Acacia within highly fragmented stands in far western NSW
TLDR
Primers for eight microsatellite loci for Acacia carneorum and Acacia loderi are developed to allow an assessment of the genetic diversity and connectedness of populations, the relative contribution of asexual reproduction to genotypic diversity and population structure, and use of paternity analysis to identify sires of seed within populations known to have set seed in past decades.
Isolation and Lack of Potential Mates may Threaten an Endangered Arid-Zone Acacia.
TLDR
It is suggested that, given this species' vast geographic range, a small number of stands with reproductively compatible near neighbors may provide the only sources of novel genotypes.
Conservation of old individual trees and small populations is integral to maintain species' genetic diversity of a historically fragmented woody perennial
TLDR
Individual genet longevity via the ability to repeatedly resprout and expand from a lignotuber may enhance the persistence of some woody perennial endemic plants despite small population size, minimal genetic interconnection and low heterozygosity.
Highly diverse and highly successful: invasive Australian acacias have not experienced genetic bottlenecks globally.
TLDR
Levels of genetic diversity are similar in native and invasive populations, and there is little evidence of invasive acacia populations being extensively inbred.
Understanding extinction debts: spatio–temporal scales, mechanisms and a roadmap for future research
Extinction debt refers to delayed species extinctions expected as a consequence of ecosystem perturbation. Quantifying such extinctions and investigating long‐term consequences of perturbations has
Fate of a rare flowering event in an endangered population of Acacia pendula (Weeping Myall) from the Hunter Valley, New South Wales
A rare flowering event in a stand of Acacia pendula (Weeping Myall) (family Fabaceae, Mimosoideae) from the Hunter Valley of New South Wales is documented. This species flowers poorly in the region

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 64 REFERENCES
Microsatellite markers for vulnerable Australian aridzone Acacias
TLDR
Primers for eight microsatellite loci for Acacia carneorum and Acacia loderi allow assessment of the genetic diversity and connectedness of populations, the relative contribution of asexual reproduction to genotypic diversity and population structure, and use of paternity analysis to identify sires of seed within populations known to have set seed in past decades.
Patterns of genotypic diversity suggest a long history of clonality and population isolation in the Australian arid zone shrub Acacia carneorum
TLDR
It is concluded that clonality has predominated in A. carneorum populations, with occasional sexual recruitment, and that current failure of most populations to set seed likely reflects both a long history of asexual reproduction and effects of habitat disturbance.
Varying levels of clonality and ploidy create barriers to gene flow and challenges for conservation of an Australian arid-zone ecosystem engineer,Acacia loderi
TLDR
The restricted distribution of clones and variation in clonality and polyploidy suggests that smaller stands may be vulnerable and warrant individual management, and Conservation of small stands may require augmentation of genotypic diversity.
Local population differentiation in Bromus tectorum L. in relation to habitat-specific selection regimes
TLDR
The results demonstrate local population differentiation in B. tectorum, resulting at least in part from differential selection on pre-adapted genotypes with characteristic marker fingerprints, and little evidence for selection favoring novel genotypes is found.
Clonality, interspecific hybridisation and inbreeding in a rare mallee eucalypt, Eucalyptus absita (Myrtaceae), and implications for conservation
TLDR
The findings indicate that despite rarity and clonality, moderate levels of genetic diversity and the capacity to produce outcrossed seeds is maintained, however, the ongoing maintenance of E. absita genetic diversity is significantly compromised by a high rate of selfing and potential hybridisation in seedling progeny.
Contrasting patterns of clonality and fine-scale genetic structure in two rare sedges with differing geographic distributions
TLDR
Despite both species being rare, asexual reproduction clearly has a more important role in the persistence of L. sp.
The Paradox of Forest Fragmentation Genetics
TLDR
It is argued that population genetics theory may be misapplied in light of ecological realities that, when recognized, require scrutiny of underlying evolutionary assumptions.
An Evolutionary Approach to Understanding the Biology of Invasions: Local Adaptation and General‐Purpose Genotypes in the Weed Verbascum thapsus
TLDR
Overall, the increasing success of V. thapsus at high elevations appears to conform more to Baker's concept of a gen- eral-purpose genotype than to invasion by rapid adaptation.
Microsatellite primers for vulnerable and thriving Acacia (Fabaceae) species from Australia’s arid zone1
TLDR
Microsatellite markers developed for the common arid Australian shrub Acacia ligulata and the threatened overstory trees A. melvillei and A. pendula will allow assessment of population genetics, mating systems, and connectedness of populations of these and possibly other arid-zone acacias.
...
...