Clinicopathological investigation of vascular parkinsonism, including clinical criteria for diagnosis

@article{Zijlmans2004ClinicopathologicalIO,
  title={Clinicopathological investigation of vascular parkinsonism, including clinical criteria for diagnosis},
  author={J. Zijlmans and S. Daniel and A. Hughes and T. Revesz and A. Lees},
  journal={Movement Disorders},
  year={2004},
  volume={19}
}
Vascular parkinsonism (VP) is difficult to diagnose with any degree of clinical certainty. We investigated the importance of macroscopic cerebral infarcts and pathological findings associated with microscopic “small vessel disease” (SVD) in the aetiology of VP. The severity of microscopic SVD pathology (perivascular pallor, gliosis, hyaline thickening, and enlargement of perivascular spaces) and the presence of macroscopically visible infarcts were assessed in 17 patients with parkinsonism and… Expand
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