Clinically plausible hyperventilation does not exert adverse hemodynamic effects during CPR but markedly reduces end-tidal PCO₂.

Abstract

AIMS Ventilation at high respiratory rates is considered detrimental during CPR because it may increase intrathoracic pressure limiting venous return and forward blood flow generation. We examined whether ventilation at high, yet clinically plausible, tidal volumes could also be detrimental, and further examined effects on end-tidal pCO(2) (P(ET)CO(2… (More)
DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2011.07.034

Topics

Cite this paper

@article{Gazmuri2012ClinicallyPH, title={Clinically plausible hyperventilation does not exert adverse hemodynamic effects during CPR but markedly reduces end-tidal PCO₂.}, author={Ra{\'u}l J Gazmuri and Iyad M. Ayoub and Jeejabai Radhakrishnan and Jill Motl and Madhav P Upadhyaya}, journal={Resuscitation}, year={2012}, volume={83 2}, pages={259-64} }