Clinical trial to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of transferring a potentially anti-arthritic cytokine gene to human joints with rheumatoid arthritis.

@article{Evans1996ClinicalTT,
  title={Clinical trial to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of transferring a potentially anti-arthritic cytokine gene to human joints with rheumatoid arthritis.},
  author={C. Evans and P. Robbins and S. Ghivizzani and J. Herndon and R. Kang and A. Bahnson and J. Barranger and E. Elders and S. Gay and M. Tomaino and M. Wasko and Simon C Watkins and T. Whiteside and J. Glorioso and M. Lotze and T. Wright},
  journal={Human gene therapy},
  year={1996},
  volume={7 10},
  pages={
          1261-80
        }
}

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Received: 7 September 1999 Revisions requested: 20 September 1999 Revisions received: 23 September 1999 Accepted: 23 September 1999 Published: 26 October 1999 © Current Science Ltd Important noteExpand
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