Clinical efficacy of galvanic skin response biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adult epilepsy: a preliminary randomized controlled study

@article{Nagai2004ClinicalEO,
  title={Clinical efficacy of galvanic skin response biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adult epilepsy: a preliminary randomized controlled study},
  author={Yoko Nagai and Laura H. Goldstein and Peter B. C. Fenwick and M. R. Trimble},
  journal={Epilepsy \& Behavior},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={216-223}
}
We investigated the effect of galvanic skin response (GSR) biofeedback training on seizure frequency in patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Eighteen patients with drug-refractory epilepsy were randomly assigned either to an active GSR biofeedback group (n = 10) or to a sham control biofeedback group (n = 8). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency in the active biofeedback group (P = 0.017), but not the control group (P > 0.10). This was manifest as a significant… Expand
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