Clinical effects of sleep fragmentation versus sleep deprivation.

@article{Bonnet2003ClinicalEO,
  title={Clinical effects of sleep fragmentation versus sleep deprivation.},
  author={Michael H. Bonnet and Donna L. Arand},
  journal={Sleep medicine reviews},
  year={2003},
  volume={7 4},
  pages={
          297-310
        }
}
Common symptoms associated with sleep fragmentation and sleep deprivation include increased objective sleepiness (as measured by the Multiple Sleep Latency Test); decreased psychomotor performance on a number of tasks including tasks involving short term memory, reaction time, or vigilance; and degraded mood. Differences in degree of sleepiness are more related to the degree of sleep loss or fragmentation rather than to the type of sleep disturbance. Both sleep fragmentation and sleep… Expand
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