Clinical effectiveness of stress-reduction techniques in patients with hypertension: systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Nagele2014ClinicalEO,
  title={Clinical effectiveness of stress-reduction techniques in patients with hypertension: systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Eva Nagele and Klaus Jeitler and Karl Horvath and Thomas Semlitsch and Nicole Posch and Kirsten H. Herrmann and Ulrich Grouven and Tatjana Hermanns and Lars G. Hemkens and Andrea Siebenhofer},
  journal={Journal of Hypertension},
  year={2014},
  volume={32},
  pages={1936–1944}
}
Objective: A systematic review and meta-analysis focusing on patient-relevant outcomes and blood pressure was conducted to assess the clinical effectiveness of stress-reduction techniques in adults with essential hypertension. Methods: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified as part of a systematic search in six electronic databases ending September 2012. RCTs comparing stress-reduction techniques versus no such techniques with a follow-up of at least 24 weeks… 

Lifestyle Medicine and the Management of Cardiovascular Disease

The benefits of lifestyle change for CVD patients have been established by decades of evidence, however, further research is needed to determine the optimal intensity, duration, and mode of delivery for interventions.

A HEALth Promotion and STRESS Management Program (HEAL-STRESS study) for prehypertensive and hypertensive patients: a quasi-experimental study in Greece

Investigation of an 8-week health-promotion programme for lowering blood pressure in prehypertensive and hypertensive patients in the community found a significant reduction in SBP and DBP, attributed to BMI and depressive symptom reductions, respectively.

Lifestyle interventions for the prevention and treatment of hypertension

Strong evidence supports the benefits of regular physical activity and exercise for the prevention and management of hypertension, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet is the most effective dietary approach to prevent hypertension and to reduce blood pressure in individuals with pre-hypertension or hypertension.

The psychometric properties of the Hypertensive Treatment Adherence Scale

All of the psychometric properties of the HTA-scale achieved the standard level and were sufficient to recommend this scale for patients with HTN.

Combining walking and relaxation for stress reduction—A randomized cross‐over trial in healthy adults

Combining physical activity and relaxation (resting or balneotherapy) is an advantageous short-term strategy for stress reduction as systolic blood pressure is reduced best while similar levels of relaxation can be obtained.

Stress reduction and wellbeing: evaluating a six-week stress control course [Thesis]

The results provide an empirical foundation for ‘Stress Control’ potentially improving positive wellbeing in addition to decreasing stress.

Clinical significance of stress-related increase in blood pressure: current evidence in office and out-of-office settings

Considering psychosocial stress as the pathogenesis of blood pressure elevation is useful for achieving an individual-focused approach and 24-h blood pressure control.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 83 REFERENCES

Benefit assessment of salt reduction in patients with hypertension: systematic overview

A benefit from a salt-reduced diet in patients with high blood pressure is not proven with regard to patient-relevant outcomes based on systematic reviews and RCTs published up to 2010, but results indicate a blood pressure-lowering effect through reduced salt intake in hypertensive patients.

Increasing Physical Activity for the Treatment of Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Although a decrease in blood pressure is shown to be a consequence of increased physical activity, RCTs of appropriate study size and quality that examine potential patient-relevant benefits or harms still need to be conducted to evaluate whether physical activity really improves the health of patients with essential hypertension.

Relaxation therapies for the management of primary hypertension in adults.

The evidence in favour of causal association between relaxation and blood pressure reduction is weak and some of the apparent benefit of relaxation was probably due to aspects of treatment unrelated to relaxation.

Qigong for hypertension: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials

There is some encouraging evidence of qigong for lowering systolic blood pressure, but the conclusiveness of these findings is limited.

Clinical effect of qigong practice on essential hypertension: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Self-practiced qigong for less than 1 year is better in decreasing BP in patients with essential hypertension than in no-treatment controls, but is not superior to that in active controls.

Biofeedback for hypertension: a systematic review

No convincing evidence is found that consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the use of any particular biofeedback treatment in the control of essential hypertension when compared with pharmacotherapy, placebo, no intervention or other behavioural therapies.

Relaxation therapies for the management of primary hypertension in adults: a Cochrane review

The evidence in favour of a causal association between relaxation and blood pressure reduction is weak and some of the apparent benefit of relaxation was probably due to aspects of treatment unrelated to relaxation.

Lifestyle interventions to reduce raised blood pressure: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Patients with elevated blood pressure should follow a weight-reducing diet, take regular exercise, and restrict alcohol and salt intake, as available evidence does not support relaxation therapies, calcium, magnesium or potassium supplements to reduce blood pressure.

The effects of biofeedback for the treatment of essential hypertension: a systematic review.

No evidence was found that consistently demonstrated the effectiveness of any particular bio feedback treatment in the control of essential hypertension when compared with pharmacotherapy, placebo (sham biofeedback treatment), no intervention or other behavioural treatments.

Blood pressure-lowering effects of biofeedback treatment in hypertension: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

The results suggested that biofeedback was more effective in reducing blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension than no intervention, however, the treatment was only found to be superior to sham or non-specific behavioral intervention when combined with other relaxation techniques.
...