Clinical applications of susceptibility weighted MR imaging of the brain – a pictorial review

@article{Thomas2007ClinicalAO,
  title={Clinical applications of susceptibility weighted MR imaging of the brain – a pictorial review},
  author={Bejoy Thomas and Sivaraman Somasundaram and Krishnamoorthy Thamburaj and Chandrasekharan Kesavadas and Arun Gupta and Narendra Kuber Bodhey and T R Kapilamoorthy},
  journal={Neuroradiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={50},
  pages={105-116}
}
IntroductionSusceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a novel magnetic resonance (MR) technique that exploits the magnetic susceptibility differences of various tissues, such as blood, iron and calcification. This pictorial review covers many clinical conditions illustrating its usefulness.Methods SWI consists of using both magnitude and phase images from a high-resolution, three-dimensional fully velocity-compensated gradient echo sequence. Phase mask is created from the MR phase images, and… 
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