Clinical and Serological Aspects of Patients with Anti-Jo-1 Antibodies – an Evolving Spectrum of Disease Manifestations

@article{Schmidt2000ClinicalAS,
  title={Clinical and Serological Aspects of Patients with Anti-Jo-1 Antibodies – an Evolving Spectrum of Disease Manifestations},
  author={Wolfgang A Schmidt and Wilfred W. Wetzel and R Friedl{\"a}nder and Robert Lange and Helmut S{\"o}rensen and H J Lichey and Ekkehard Genth and Rudolf Mierau and E J Gromnica-ihle},
  journal={Clinical Rheumatology},
  year={2000},
  volume={19},
  pages={371-377}
}
Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare ELISA, immunodiffusion and immunoblot for the detection of anti-Jo-1 antibodies, and to investigate the association of the results with clinical manifestations. In two medical centres for rheumatology and one for pulmonology, all patients with suspected connective tissue disease were screened over a 5-year period for anti-Jo-1 antibodies by ELISA. Positive sera were controlled in another laboratory by immunodiffusion. If immunodiffusion was… 
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Clinical characteristics of children with positive anti-SSA/SSB
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It is observed that a low proportion of childhood SS (4/20) exists in patients with positive SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies, and it is suggested that clinicians should focus more on the clinical symptoms in these patients, rather than undertaking diagnostic interventions to rule out Sjogren's syndrome.
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