Clinical Practice Guideline

@article{Baugh2013ClinicalPG,
  title={Clinical Practice Guideline},
  author={Reginald F. Baugh and Gregory J Basura and Lisa E Ishii and Seth R. Schwartz and Caitlin Murray Drumheller and Rebecca Burkholder and Nathan A Deckard and Cindy J Dawson and Colin L. W. Driscoll and Marion Boyd Gillespie and Richard K Gurgel and John J Halperin and Ayesha N. Khalid and Kaparaboyna Ashok Kumar and Alan G. Micco and Debra S. Munsell and Steven Rosenbaum and William Vaughan},
  journal={Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery},
  year={2013},
  volume={149},
  pages={S1 - S27}
}
Objective Bell’s palsy, named after the Scottish anatomist, Sir Charles Bell, is the most common acute mono-neuropathy, or disorder affecting a single nerve, and is the most common diagnosis associated with facial nerve weakness/paralysis. Bell’s palsy is a rapid unilateral facial nerve paresis (weakness) or paralysis (complete loss of movement) of unknown cause. The condition leads to the partial or complete inability to voluntarily move facial muscles on the affected side of the face… Expand
161 Citations

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
The objective of this study is to compare the effects of mime therapy using mirror therapy application of tablet PC vs mime therapy on acute bell's palsy. Study Design was Randomized… Expand
ConditionsBell Palsy
InterventionOther
Blog Post
Facial nerve palsy: Clinical Practice and Cognitive Errors.
TLDR
The erroneous use of the eponym Bell's palsy to refer to all causes of facial paralysis, regardless of the history and presentation, may result in cognitive errors including premature closure, anchoring bias, and diagnosis momentum. Expand
The etiology of Bell’s palsy: a review
TLDR
It is suggested that the diagnosis of idiopathic facial palsy is based on exclusion and is most often made based on five factors including anatomical structure, viral infection, ischemia, inflammation, and cold stimulation responsivity. Expand
Facial Paralysis: Clinical Practice Guideline of the Spanish Society of Otolaryngology
TLDR
This guideline was promoted by the Spanish Society of Otolaryngology and developed by a group of physicians with an interest in facial nerve disorders, including at least one physician from each Autonomous Community, in a question and answer format. Expand
Recovery from Idiopathic Facial Paralysis (Bell’s Palsy) Using Photobiomodulation in Patients Non-Responsive to Standard Treatment: A Case Series Study
TLDR
PBM could be a supportive therapy for the management of Bell′s palsy in patients non-responsive to standard treatment, however, randomized controlled trials are necessary to sustain the encouraging results, exclude bias, and better explain the boundary between the time from diagnosis and the recovery of BP through PBM therapy. Expand
Clinical Practice Guideline
  • R. Baugh, G. Basura, +15 authors William Vaughan
  • Medicine
  • Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • 2013
TLDR
The rationale, purpose, and key action statements of the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell’s Palsy are summarized, which encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. Expand
Clinical practice guidelines in idiopathic facial paralysis: systematic review using the appraisal of guidelines for research and evaluation (AGREE II) instrument
TLDR
The objective of the authors is to appraise the existing CPGs for Bell’s palsy to ensure safe and effective practices and to look to the quality domains of rigor of development, stakeholder involvement, and applicability as the greatest opportunities for improvement. Expand
Facial nerve decompression
TLDR
Patients with complete facial paralysis secondary to Bell's palsy or temporal bone trauma, more than 90% degeneration on electroneurography testing, and absent voluntary electromyography within 14 days of onset may benefit from facial nerve decompression. Expand
Course of Concomitant Bell's Palsy and Trigeminal Neuralgia Shortened with a Multi-Modal Intervention: A Case Report.
TLDR
This is the first case report on concomitant trigeminal neuralgia and Bell's palsy, and the patient sought out integrative medical care including acupuncture, nutritional supplements, diet and lifestyle changes, and parenteral therapy with intravenous vitamins and minerals. Expand
Bell's Palsy.
TLDR
A combination of medical and surgical treatment options exist to treat the long-term sequelae of Bell's palsy. Expand
Facial Nerve Paraganglioma Masquerading as Bell palsy: A Reconstructive Pitfall
TLDR
A 66-year old Hispanic woman with systemic lupus erythematosus presented to the plastic surgery clinic with complaints of drooling and being unable to smile and was initially misdiagnosed as BP, that resulted in facial paralysis from neoplastic invasion of the facial nerve. Expand
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 162 REFERENCES
Bell's palsy: diagnosis and management.
TLDR
Treatment with a seven-day course of acyclovir or valacyclovIR and a tapering course of prednisone, initiated within three days of the onset of symptoms, is recommended to reduce the time to full recovery and increase the likelihood of complete recuperation. Expand
Bell's palsy.
TLDR
This systematic review presents information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiviral treatment, corticosteroids (alone or plus antivirus treatment), facial nerve decompression surgery, and mime therapy. Expand
Bell's Palsy: The Spontaneous Course of 2,500 Peripheral Facial Nerve Palsies of Different Etiologies
  • E. Peitersen
  • Medicine
  • Acta oto-laryngologica. Supplementum
  • 2002
TLDR
A survey of the literature showed that no kind of treatment, including prednisone, was able to give a better prognosis and the use ofprednisone raises a big ethical problem because no evidence of its efficacy exists and the euphoric side-effect induces a false feeling of benefit in the patients. Expand
The True Nature of Bell's Palsy: Analysis af 1,000 Consecutive Patients
TLDR
It is concluded that Bell's palsy is an acute benign cranial polyneuritis probably caused by reactivation of the herpes‐simplex virus, and the dysfunction of the motor cranial nerves may represent inflammation and demyelinization rather than ischemic compression. Expand
Management of Bell"s palsy: a report of 2 cases.
TLDR
2 cases of Bell"s palsy in children that were managed with antiviral agents are described; both patients experienced complete recovery within 28 days; after 1 year follow-up, no recurrence was observed and both patients have normal facial movement. Expand
Facial nerve decompression for idiopathic Bell's palsy: report of 13 cases and literature review
TLDR
Emagyography is useful to identify patients with severe palsy and an unfavourable prognosis and these patients would probably benefit from facial nerve decompression, according to the authors. Expand
Bell's palsy may have relations to bacterial infection.
TLDR
According to clinical observation and some facts that do not favor the viral infections theory, it is concluded that all Bell's palsy is not related to viral infections, some even may have relations to bacterial infection. Expand
The Management of Peripheral Facial Nerve Palsy: "Paresis" Versus "Paralysis" and Sources of Ambiguity in Study Designs
  • T. Linder, Wael Abdelkafy, Sandra Cavero-Vanek
  • Medicine
  • Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • 2010
TLDR
The time course for improvement and the extent of recovery is significantly different in patients presenting with an incomplete facial nerve paresis compared with patients with a total paralysis, finding a highly significant difference regarding the time course and final outcome in patients with incomplete palsies versus total paralysis. Expand
Indications for surgery for Bell's palsy.
TLDR
Rehabilitation surgical procedures should be reserved for patients with acute Bell's palsy with keratitis unresponsive to medical therapy or for those seen late in the course of the disease to correct undesirable sequelae. Expand
Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).
TLDR
The available evidence does not show significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids, and more randomised controlled trials with a greater number of patients are needed to determine reliably whether there is real benefit (or harm) from the use of steroid therapy. Expand
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