Clinical Peer Review: Burnishing a Tarnished Icon

@article{Dans1993ClinicalPR,
  title={Clinical Peer Review: Burnishing a Tarnished Icon},
  author={Peter E. Dans},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={1993},
  volume={118},
  pages={566-568}
}
  • P. Dans
  • Published 1 April 1993
  • Medicine
  • Annals of Internal Medicine
Hayward and colleagues, in this issue of Annals, show that implicit criteria, widely used in peer review to assess quality of care, are inadequate. Prescriptions for improving peer review are suggested. Physician groups frequently extol the sanctity of clinical peer review. In this issue of Annals, however, Hayward and colleagues [1] confirm that the way most physicians and review organizations do peer review to assess quality of care is unreliable [2]. Well-trained internists were asked to… 
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