Clinical Implications of Neuroscience Research in PTSD

@article{Kolk2006ClinicalIO,
  title={Clinical Implications of Neuroscience Research in PTSD},
  author={B. A. van der Kolk},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={1071}
}
Abstract:  The research showing how exposure to extreme stress affects brain function is making important contributions to understanding the nature of traumatic stress. This includes the notion that traumatized individuals are vulnerable to react to sensory information with subcortically initiated responses that are irrelevant, and often harmful, in the present. Reminders of traumatic experiences activate brain regions that support intense emotions, and decrease activation in the central… Expand
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