Clinical, radiological, neurophysiological, and neuropathological characteristics of gluten ataxia

@article{Hadjivassiliou1998ClinicalRN,
  title={Clinical, radiological, neurophysiological, and neuropathological characteristics of gluten ataxia},
  author={Marios Hadjivassiliou and R. A. Grünewald and A K Chattopadhyay and G Aelwyn B Davies-Jones and A. Gibson and J. R. Jarratt and R. H. Kandler and A. Lobo and Tom Powell and C.M.L. Smith},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1998},
  volume={352},
  pages={1582-1585}
}
BACKGROUND Ataxia is the commonest neurological manifestation of coeliac disease. Some individuals with genetic susceptibility to the disease have serological evidence of gluten sensitivity without overt gastrointestinal symptoms or evidence of small-bowel inflammation. The sole manifestation of disease in such patients may be ataxia. We describe the clinical, radiological, and neurophysiological features of this disorder. METHODS Patients with ataxia attending the neurology outpatient… 
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TLDR
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