Climatic and geographic influences on arboviral infections and vectors.

@article{Mellor2000ClimaticAG,
  title={Climatic and geographic influences on arboviral infections and vectors.},
  author={Philip Scott Mellor and Colin J. Leake},
  journal={Revue scientifique et technique},
  year={2000},
  volume={19 1},
  pages={
          41-54
        }
}
Those components of climate that are likely to have major effects upon the geographical distribution, seasonal incidence and prevalence of vector-borne diseases are described. On the basis of existing and predicted climatic variations, examples are given of the types of changes that are to be expected, using several internationally important human and animal arboviral diseases including Rift Valley fever and African horse sickness. 

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