Climate variability in the SW Indian Ocean from an 8000-yr long multi-proxy record in the Mauritian lowlands shows a middle to late Holocene shift from negative IOD-state to ENSO-state

@article{Boer2014ClimateVI,
  title={Climate variability in the SW Indian Ocean from an 8000-yr long multi-proxy record in the Mauritian lowlands shows a middle to late Holocene shift from negative IOD-state to ENSO-state},
  author={Erik J. de Boer and Rik Tjallingii and Maria Isabel Velez and Kenneth F. Rijsdijk and Anouk Vlug and Gert‐Jan Reichart and Amy Prendergast and Perry G. B. de Louw and François Benjamin Vincent Florens and Cl{\'a}udia Baider and Henry Hooghiemstra},
  journal={Quaternary Science Reviews},
  year={2014},
  volume={86},
  pages={175-189}
}

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