Climate sensitivity, sea level and atmospheric carbon dioxide

@article{Hansen2013ClimateSS,
  title={Climate sensitivity, sea level and atmospheric carbon dioxide},
  author={James E. Hansen and Makiko Sato and Gary L. Russell and Pushker A. Kharecha},
  journal={Philosophical transactions. Series A, Mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={371}
}
  • J. HansenMakiko Sato P. Kharecha
  • Published 20 November 2012
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Philosophical transactions. Series A, Mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences
Cenozoic temperature, sea level and CO2 covariations provide insights into climate sensitivity to external forcings and sea-level sensitivity to climate change. Climate sensitivity depends on the initial climate state, but potentially can be accurately inferred from precise palaeoclimate data. Pleistocene climate oscillations yield a fast-feedback climate sensitivity of 3±1°C for a 4 W m−2 CO2 forcing if Holocene warming relative to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is used as calibration, but the… 

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