Climate change frames debate over the extinction of megafauna in Sahul (Pleistocene Australia-New Guinea)

@article{Wroe2013ClimateCF,
  title={Climate change frames debate over the extinction of megafauna in Sahul (Pleistocene Australia-New Guinea)},
  author={S. Wroe and J. Field and M. Archer and D. Grayson and G. Price and J. Louys and J. Faith and G. Webb and I. Davidson and S. Mooney},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={110},
  pages={8777 - 8781}
}
Around 88 large vertebrate taxa disappeared from Sahul sometime during the Pleistocene, with the majority of losses (54 taxa) clearly taking place within the last 400,000 years. The largest was the 2.8-ton browsing Diprotodon optatum, whereas the ∼100- to 130-kg marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, the world’s most specialized mammalian carnivore, and Varanus priscus, the largest lizard known, were formidable predators. Explanations for these extinctions have centered on climatic change or… Expand
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