Climate change and population declines in a long-distance migratory bird

@article{Both2006ClimateCA,
  title={Climate change and population declines in a long-distance migratory bird},
  author={Christiaan Both and Sandra Bouwhuis and Catherine M. Lessells and Marcel Erik Visser},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={441},
  pages={81-83}
}
Phenological responses to climate change differ across trophic levels, which may lead to birds failing to breed at the time of maximal food abundance. Here we investigate the population consequences of such mistiming in the migratory pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca. In a comparison of nine Dutch populations, we find that populations have declined by about 90% over the past two decades in areas where the food for provisioning nestlings peaks early in the season and the birds are currently… 
Effects of climate change on avian life history and fitness
TLDR
The majority of studies supports that birds are not fully able to synchronise their broods with the peak of food abundance, thus reducing reproductive success, and the repercussions of global warming on life history traits and fitness correlates of avian populations depend on the adaptive potential of the population.
Avian population consequences of climate change are most severe for long-distance migrants in seasonal habitats
TLDR
It is shown that insectivorous long-distance migrant species in The Netherlands declined strongly in forests, a habitat characterized by a short spring food peak, but that they did not decline in less seasonal marshes, suggesting that habitat quality did not deteriorate.
An Eco-Evolutionary Model for Demographic and Phenological Responses in Migratory Birds
TLDR
This work extends previous models of phenological adaptation to climate change under territory competition to include feedback from population dynamics, winter survival and habitat productivity, and shows that phenological responses depend strongly on equilibrium population density via effects on territory competition.
Populations of migratory bird species that did not show a phenological response to climate change are declining
TLDR
The findings imply that ecological factors affecting population trends can change over time and suggest that ongoing climatic changes will increasingly threaten vulnerable migratory bird species, augmenting their extinction risk.
Climate warming, ecological mismatch at arrival and population decline in migratory birds
TLDR
Findings provide general support to the largely untested hypotheses that migratory birds are becoming ecologically mismatched and that failure to respond to climate change can have severe negative impacts on their populations.
Climate change and the demographic demise of a hoarding bird living on the edge
TLDR
Evidence that climate change has contributed to deteriorating reproductive success in a rapidly declining population of the grey jay at the southern edge of its range is reported, which may signal a climate-driven range contraction through local extinctions along the trailing edge.
Current selection for lower migratory activity will drive the evolution of residency in a migratory bird population
  • F. Pulido, P. Berthold
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2010
TLDR
The findings suggest that current alterations of the environment are favoring birds wintering closer to the breeding grounds and that populations of migratory birds have strongly responded to these changes in selection.
Climate change leads to decreasing bird migration
Global climate change has led to warmer winters in NW Europe, shortening the distance between suitable overwintering areas and the breeding areas of many bird species. Here we show that winter
Climate change and the risks associated with delayed breeding in a tropical wild bird population
TLDR
It is shown that the frequency of spring rainfall affects the timing of breeding, with birds breeding later in wetter springs, implying that climate change is exposing birds to the stochastic risks of late reproduction by causing them to start breeding relatively late in the season.
Climate change and the optimal arrival of migratory birds
TLDR
A theoretical model is developed to study how the optimal arrival time depends on the mean and variance of the food distribution, the degree of competition for territories and the risk of mortality, and shows that the optimal shift in arrival date should never be as extreme as the shift in food peak date.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 57 REFERENCES
Adjustment to climate change is constrained by arrival date in a long-distance migrant bird
TLDR
It is shown that the migratory pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca has advanced its laying date over the past 20 years, but this temporal shift has been insufficient, as indicated by increased selection for earlier breeding over the same period.
The effect of climate change on the correlation between avian life‐history traits
TLDR
In a long‐term study of the migratory Pied Flycatcher, it is shown that the peak of abundance of nestling food (caterpillars) has advanced during the last two decades, and that the birds advanced their LD.
Climatic effects on timing of spring migration and breeding in a long‐distance migrant, the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
It is shown that both arrival and breeding date depend on temperatures at their main North African staging grounds, as well as on temperature at the breeding grounds, which suggests that breeding date is indeed constrained by arrival of females.
Variable responses to large-scale climate change in European Parus populations
TLDR
It is shown that the phenological response to large–scale changes in spring temperature varies across a species' range, even between populations situated close to each other, and that this variation cannot be fully explained by variation in the temperature change during the pre– and post–laying periods, as recently suggested.
Shifts in caterpillar biomass phenology due to climate change and its impact on the breeding biology of an insectivorous bird
TLDR
The descriptive models for both the caterpillar biomass peak as for the great tit laying dates are used to predict shifts in caterpillar and bird phenology 2005–2100, using an IPCC climate scenario and show that both the number of fledglings as well as their fledging weight is affected by this synchrony.
Predicting the effects of climate change on avian life-history traits
TLDR
It is found that clutch size is strongly related to lay date, both within and among years, and there has been no significant temporal variation in the slopes or intercepts of the clutch-size/lay-date regressions.
Warmer springs lead to mistimed reproduction in great tits (Parus major)
TLDR
This work believes that this is the first documented case of an adaptive response being hampered because a changing abiotic factor affects the environment in which a reproductive decision is made differently from the environments in which selection occurs.
Cryptic evolution in a wild bird population
TLDR
The mismatch between response to selection at the levels of genotype and phenotype can be explained by environmental deterioration, concealing underlying evolution.
Large–scale geographical variation confirms that climate change causes birds to lay earlier
  • C. Both, A. Artemyev, M. Visser
  • Environmental Science
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2004
TLDR
Trends in spring temperature varied markedly between study sites, and across populations the advancement of laying date was stronger in areas where the spring temperatures increased more, giving support to the theory that climate change causally affects breeding date advancement.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...