Climate change and extreme heat events.

@article{Luber2008ClimateCA,
  title={Climate change and extreme heat events.},
  author={George Luber and Michael A Mcgeehin},
  journal={American journal of preventive medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={35 5},
  pages={
          429-35
        }
}
The association between climate change and the frequency and intensity of extreme heat events is now well established. General circulation models of climate change predict that heatwaves will become more frequent and intense, especially in the higher latitudes, affecting large metropolitan areas that are not well adapted to them. Exposure to extreme heat is already a significant public health problem and the primary cause of weather-related mortality in the U.S. This article reviews major… 
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