Climate change, rainfall, and social conflict in Africa

@article{Hendrix2012ClimateCR,
  title={Climate change, rainfall, and social conflict in Africa},
  author={Cullen Hendrix and Idean Salehyan},
  journal={Journal of Peace Research},
  year={2012},
  volume={49},
  pages={35 - 50}
}
Much of the debate over the security implications of climate change revolves around whether changing weather patterns will lead to future conflict. This article addresses whether deviations from normal rainfall patterns affect the propensity for individuals and groups to engage in disruptive activities such as demonstrations, riots, strikes, communal conflict, and anti-government violence. In contrast to much of the environmental security literature, it uses a much broader definition of… 

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