Climate as a Driver of Evolutionary Change

@article{Erwin2009ClimateAA,
  title={Climate as a Driver of Evolutionary Change},
  author={Douglas H. Erwin},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={R575-R583}
}
  • D. Erwin
  • Published 28 July 2009
  • Environmental Science
  • Current Biology

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