Climate Change Sentiment on Twitter: An Unsolicited Public Opinion Poll

@article{Cody2015ClimateCS,
  title={Climate Change Sentiment on Twitter: An Unsolicited Public Opinion Poll},
  author={Emily M. Cody and Andrew J. Reagan and Lewis Mitchell and Peter Sheridan Dodds and Christopher M. Danforth},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2015},
  volume={10}
}
  • Emily M. Cody, Andrew J. Reagan, +2 authors Christopher M. Danforth
  • Published 2015
  • Physics, Computer Science, Medicine, Biology
  • PLoS ONE
  • The consequences of anthropogenic climate change are extensively debated through scientific papers, newspaper articles, and blogs. Newspaper articles may lack accuracy, while the severity of findings in scientific papers may be too opaque for the public to understand. Social media, however, is a forum where individuals of diverse backgrounds can share their thoughts and opinions. As consumption shifts from old media to new, Twitter has become a valuable resource for analyzing current events and… CONTINUE READING

    Figures and Topics from this paper.

    Explore key concepts

    Links to highly relevant papers for key concepts in this paper:

    Citations

    Publications citing this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 73 CITATIONS

    Twitter Analytics-Based Assessment: Are the United States Coastal Regions Prepared for Climate Changeƒ

    VIEW 1 EXCERPT
    CITES BACKGROUND

    FILTER CITATIONS BY YEAR

    2016
    2020

    CITATION STATISTICS

    • 3 Highly Influenced Citations

    • Averaged 17 Citations per year from 2018 through 2020

    References

    Publications referenced by this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 62 REFERENCES

    What is Twitter, a social network or a news media?

    VIEW 2 EXCERPTS