Cleaner Mites: Sanitary Mutualism in the Miniature Ecosystem of Neotropical Bee Nests

@article{Biani2009CleanerMS,
  title={Cleaner Mites: Sanitary Mutualism in the Miniature Ecosystem of Neotropical Bee Nests},
  author={Natalia B. Biani and Ulrich G Mueller and William T. Wcislo},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2009},
  volume={173},
  pages={841 - 847}
}
Cleaning symbioses represent classic models of mutualism, and some bee mites are thought to perform cleaning services for their hosts in exchange for suitable environments for reproduction and dispersal. These mutual benefits, however, have not been rigorously demonstrated. We tested the sanitary role of bee mites by correlating mite loads with fungal contamination in natural nests of Megalopta genalis and Megalopta ecuadoria and by experimentally manipulating mite loads in artificial cells… Expand
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