Corpus ID: 54039075

Classifying Phenomena Part 2 : Types and Levels 37 Classifying Phenomena Part 2 : Types and Levels †

@inproceedings{Gnoli2018ClassifyingPP,
  title={Classifying Phenomena Part 2 : Types and Levels 37 Classifying Phenomena Part 2 : Types and Levels †},
  author={C. Gnoli},
  year={2018}
}
After making the case that phenomena can be the primary unit of classification (Part 1), some basic principles to group and sort phenomena are considered. Entities can be grouped together on the basis of both their similarity (morphology) and their common origin (phylogeny). The resulting groups will form the classical hierarchical chains of types and subtypes. At every hierarchical degree, phenomena can form ordered sets (arrays), where their sorting can reflect levels of increasing… Expand

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Classifying Phenomena Part 2: Types and Levels
TLDR
After making the case that phenomena can be the primary unit of classification (Part 1), some basic principles to group and sort phenomena are considered and a list of twenty-six layers is proposed to form the main classes of the Integrative Levels Classification system. Expand

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After making the case that phenomena can be the primary unit of classification (Part 1), some basic principles to group and sort phenomena are considered and a list of twenty-six layers is proposed to form the main classes of the Integrative Levels Classification system. Expand
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