Classifying Antiarrhythmic Actions: By Facts or Speculation

@article{Williams1992ClassifyingAA,
  title={Classifying Antiarrhythmic Actions: By Facts or Speculation},
  author={E. Miles Vaughan Williams},
  journal={The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology},
  year={1992},
  volume={32}
}
  • E. Williams
  • Published 1 November 1992
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Classification of antiarrhythmic actions is reviewed in the context of the results of the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trials, CAST 1 and 2. Six criticisms of the classification recently published (The Sicilian Gambit) are discussed in detail. The alternative classification, when stripped of speculative elements, is shown to be similar to the original classification. Claims that the classification failed to predict the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs for the selection of appropriate therapy… 
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TLDR
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Significance of Classifying Antiarrhythmic Actions Since the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial
TLDR
The Cardiac Antiarrhythmic Suppression Trial (CAST) showed flecainide and encainide induced excess mortality compared with placebo, and the mechanisms of adrenergic arrhythmogenicity are discussed.
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TLDR
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