Classification of Asphyxia: The Need for Standardization

@article{Sauvageau2010ClassificationOA,
  title={Classification of Asphyxia: The Need for Standardization},
  author={Anny Sauvageau and Elie Boghossian},
  journal={Journal of Forensic Sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={55}
}
The classification of asphyxia and the definitions of subtypes are far from being uniform, varying widely from one textbook to another and from one paper to the next. [...] Key Method Suffocation subdivides in smothering, choking, and confined spaces/entrapment/vitiated atmosphere. Strangulation includes three separate forms: ligature strangulation, hanging, and manual strangulation. As for mechanical asphyxia, it encompasses positional asphyxia as well as traumatic asphyxia. The rationales behind this proposed…Expand
Commentary on: Sauvageau A, Boghossian E. Classification of asphyxia: the need for standardization. J Forensic Sci 2010;55(5):1259‐67.
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TLDR
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