Classification and phylogeny of the diapsid reptiles

@article{Benton1985ClassificationAP,
  title={Classification and phylogeny of the diapsid reptiles},
  author={Michael J. Benton},
  journal={Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  year={1985},
  volume={84},
  pages={97-164}
}
  • M. Benton
  • Published 1 June 1985
  • Biology
  • Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
Reptiles with two temporal openings in the skull are generally divided into two groups–the Lepidosauria (lizards, snakes, Sphenodon, ‘eosuchians’) and the Archosauria (crocodiles, thecodontians, dinosaurs, pterosaurs). Recent suggestions that these two are not sister-groups are shown to be unproven, whereas there is strong evidence that they form a monophyletic group, the Diapsida, on the basis of several synapomorphies of living and fossil forms. A cladistic analysis of skull and skeletal… 
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Two Triassic sphenodontid reptiles, Brachyrhinodon taylori and Polysphenodon mulleri, are redescribed and it is assumed that the reduced snout has been independently derived in each genus.
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A new rhynchocephalian taxon from the Middle Jurassic of Patagonia, Argentina is described, representing the first Jurassic record of the group in South America and suggesting some degree of endemism during the initial stages of the breakup of Pangaea.
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