Classification and definition of disorders causing hypertonia in childhood.

@article{Sanger2003ClassificationAD,
  title={Classification and definition of disorders causing hypertonia in childhood.},
  author={T. Sanger and M. Delgado and D. Gaebler-Spira and M. Hallett and J. Mink},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2003},
  volume={111 1},
  pages={
          e89-97
        }
}
OBJECTIVE This report describes the consensus outcome of an interdisciplinary workshop that was held at the National Institutes of Health in April 2001. [...] Key Method "Dystonia" is defined as a movement disorder in which involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions cause twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both.Expand
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