Classical Verification of Quantum Computations

@article{Mahadev2018ClassicalVO,
  title={Classical Verification of Quantum Computations},
  author={Urmila Mahadev},
  journal={2018 IEEE 59th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science (FOCS)},
  year={2018},
  pages={259-267}
}
  • U. Mahadev
  • Published 3 April 2018
  • Computer Science
  • 2018 IEEE 59th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science (FOCS)
We present the first protocol allowing a classical computer to interactively verify the result of an efficient quantum computation. We achieve this by constructing a measurement protocol, which enables a classical verifier to use a quantum prover as a trusted measurement device. The protocol forces the prover to behave as follows: the prover must construct an n qubit state of his choice, measure each qubit in the Hadamard or standard basis as directed by the verifier, and report the measurement… 
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    2018 IEEE 59th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science (FOCS)
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