• Corpus ID: 218628815

Classical Simulation of Quantum Supremacy Circuits

@article{Huang2020ClassicalSO,
  title={Classical Simulation of Quantum Supremacy Circuits},
  author={Cupjin Huang and Fang Zhang and Michael Newman and Junjie Cai and Xun Gao and Zhengxiong Tian and Junyin Wu and Haihong Xu and Huanjun Yu and Bo Yuan and Mario Szegedy and Yaoyun Shi and Jianxin Chen},
  journal={arXiv: Quantum Physics},
  year={2020}
}
It is believed that random quantum circuits are difficult to simulate classically. These have been used to demonstrate quantum supremacy: the execution of a computational task on a quantum computer that is infeasible for any classical computer. The task underlying the assertion of quantum supremacy by Arute et al. (Nature, 574, 505--510 (2019)) was initially estimated to require Summit, the world's most powerful supercomputer today, approximately 10,000 years. The same task was performed on the… 

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