Clarifying Costs: Can Increased Price Transparency Reduce Healthcare Spending?

@article{Muir2013ClarifyingCC,
  title={Clarifying Costs: Can Increased Price Transparency Reduce Healthcare Spending?},
  author={M. Muir and Stephanie A. Alessi and J. King},
  journal={UC Hastings College of the Law Legal Studies Research Paper Series},
  year={2013}
}
  • M. Muir, Stephanie A. Alessi, J. King
  • Published 2013
  • Business
  • UC Hastings College of the Law Legal Studies Research Paper Series
  • As healthcare expenditures continue to climb, politicians, business leaders, and patients avidly search for new methods to reduce healthcare costs. In an eleven-point plan released this summer, a group of the nation’s top healthcare experts listed “full transparency of prices” as one potential solution to reduce healthcare costs. The experts, some of whom helped write the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, argued that price transparency would allow consumers to compare prices before… CONTINUE READING
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