Cladistics and Early Hominid Phylogeny

@article{Strait1999CladisticsAE,
  title={Cladistics and Early Hominid Phylogeny},
  author={David S. Strait and Frederick E. Grine},
  journal={Science},
  year={1999},
  volume={285},
  pages={1209 - 1209}
}
Two recent reports (B. Asfaw et al. , 23 Apr., p. [629][1]; M. A. McCollum, 9 Apr., p. [301][2]) ([1][3], [2][4]) are skeptical about the utility of cladistic analysis to resolve questions about early hominid phylogeny. Although we disagree with aspects of these studies ([3][5], [4][6]), it is true 
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