Civilian mortality after the 2003 invasion of Iraq

@article{Burkle2013CivilianMA,
  title={Civilian mortality after the 2003 invasion of Iraq},
  author={Frederick M. Burkle and Richard Garfield},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2013},
  volume={381},
  pages={877-879}
}
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