Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. competition with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

@article{Mclennan1991CirsiumA,
  title={Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. competition with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)},
  author={B. Mclennan and R. Ashford and M. Devine},
  journal={Weed Research},
  year={1991},
  volume={31},
  pages={409-415}
}
Summary: A series of field experiments was conducted to evaluate the competitive effect of Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. ‘Norstar’) yield. Grain yield at the centre of dense C. arvense patches ranged from 28–71% of the yield in adjacent weed-free plots, based on measurements made at 11 experimental sites over a 2-year period. The mean reduction in yield was 49%. Two models were used to describe grain yield reduction in terms of C. arvense shoot density: (a… Expand
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