Cire Perdue Copper Casting in Pre-Columbian Mexico: An Experimental Approach

@article{Long1964CirePC,
  title={Cire Perdue Copper Casting in Pre-Columbian Mexico: An Experimental Approach},
  author={Stanley V. Long},
  journal={American Antiquity},
  year={1964},
  volume={30},
  pages={189 - 192}
}
  • S. V. Long
  • Published 1 October 1964
  • Materials Science
  • American Antiquity
Abstract Sahagún's General History of the Things of New Spain, a Nahuatl text completed in 1555, contains an ethnographic description of cire perdue gold casting. Aboriginal copper casting was not described. However, it is believed that his gold-casting description also constitutes a basically valid description of copper casting. To test this, experiments were undertaken to cast copper bells following Sahagún's description of gold casting and using native materials whenever possible. From the… 

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