Circulatory shock.

@article{Vincent2013CirculatoryS,
  title={Circulatory shock.},
  author={Jean Louis Vincent and Daniel De Backer},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={369 18},
  pages={
          1726-34
        }
}
Copyright © 2013 Massachusetts Medical Society. Shock is the clinical expression of circulatory failure that results in inadequate cellular oxygen utilization. Shock is a common condition in critical care, affecting about one third of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).1 A diagnosis of shock is based on clinical, hemodynamic, and biochemical signs, which can broadly be summarized into three components. First, systemic arterial hypotension is usually present, but the magnitude of the… Expand
What matters in shock? Flow or pressure?
TLDR
Patients with circulatory shock must therefore be carefully monitored, including regular assessment of cardiac output, and treatment and targets adapted accordingly, taking into account various factors including age and history of chronic hypertension. Expand
Septic Shock: Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment.
TLDR
Clinicians should understand the importance of prompt administration of intravenous fluids and vasoactive medications aimed at restoring adequate circulation, and the limitations of protocol-based therapy, as guided by recent evidence. Expand
Noninvasive Cardiovascular Monitoring
Circulatory shock in the critically ill commonly occurs from trauma, hemorrhage, high-risk surgery, sepsis, anaphylaxis, burns, tension pneumothorax, and cardiac emergencies such as acute myocardialExpand
The Diagnosis and Hemodynamic Monitoring of Circulatory Shock: Current and Future Trends
TLDR
The present paper discusses the issues raised in the new statements, including individualization of blood pressure targets, prediction of fluid responsiveness, and the use of echocardiography as the first means during the initial evaluation of circulatory shock. Expand
Should we aim at high blood pressure targets in patients with cardiogenic shock?
TLDR
The authors observed an increase in cardiac index and cardiac power associated with a decrease in blood lactate levels and an improvement in some microcirculatory variables such as changes in StO2 reperfusion slope assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy during a hypoxic challenge. Expand
Managing the first 120 min of cardiogenic shock: from resuscitation to diagnosis
TLDR
Early stabilization of hemodynamics and end-organ function is necessary to achieve best outcomes in cardiogenic shock, and a structured ABCDE approach involving stabilization of the airway, breathing and circulation is described. Expand
Untreated Relative Hypotension Measured as Perfusion Pressure Deficit During Management of Shock and New-Onset Acute Kidney Injury-A Literature Review.
TLDR
Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate whether adoption of individualized BP targets, which are initially guided by patient's premorbid basal BP and then tailored according to clinical response, is superior to conventional BP targets for vasopressor therapy, particularly among patients with vasodilatory shock states. Expand
Consensus on circulatory shock and hemodynamic monitoring. Task force of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine
TLDR
This consensus provides 44 statements that can be used at the bedside to diagnose, treat and monitor patients with shock. Expand
One approach to circulation and blood flow in the critical care unit
TLDR
A minimalistic guide to the clinical information relevant when assessing critically ill patients with failing circulation is created and measures such as organ blood flow, circulating volume, and hemodynamic biomarkers of shock are described. Expand
Continuous cardiac output assessment or serial echocardiography during septic shock resuscitation?
  • P. Vignon
  • Medicine
  • Annals of translational medicine
  • 2020
TLDR
Transpulmonary thermodilution allowing continuous tracking of cardiac output variations and CCE appear complementary rather than mutually exclusive in patients with septic shock who require advanced hemodynamic monitoring. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 36 REFERENCES
Comparison of norepinephrine-dobutamine to epinephrine for hemodynamics, lactate metabolism, and organ function variables in cardiogenic shock. A prospective, randomized pilot study*
TLDR
The combination norepinephrine-dobutamine appears to be a more reliable and safer strategy than epinephrine in dopamine-resistant cardiogenic shock, when considering global hemodynamic effects. Expand
The influence of early hemodynamic optimization on biomarker patterns of severe sepsis and septic shock*
Background:Despite abundant experimental studies of biomarker patterns in early severe sepsis and septic shock, human data are few. Further, the impact of the severity of global tissue hypoxiaExpand
Interaction of vasopressin infusion, corticosteroid treatment, and mortality of septic shock*
TLDR
The combination of low-dose vasopressin and corticosteroids was associated with decreased mortality and organ dysfunction compared with norepinephrine and cortICosteroids. Expand
Does dopamine administration in shock influence outcome? Results of the Sepsis Occurrence in Acutely Ill Patients (SOAP) Study*
TLDR
It is suggested that dopamine administration may be associated with increased mortality rates in shock, and there is a need for a prospective study comparing dopamine with other catecholamines in the management of circulatory shock. Expand
Clinical review: Update on hemodynamic monitoring - a consensus of 16
TLDR
An objective review of the available monitoring systems, including their specific advantages and limitations, and highlighting some key principles underlying hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients are offered. Expand
Persistent microcirculatory alterations are associated with organ failure and death in patients with septic shock*
TLDR
Microcirculatory alterations improve rapidly in septic shock survivors but not in patients dying with multiple organ failure, regardless of whether shock has resolved. Expand
Vasopressin versus norepinephrine infusion in patients with septic shock.
TLDR
Low-dose vasopressin did not reduce mortality rates as compared with norepinephrine among patients with septic shock who were being treated with conventional (catecholamine) vasopressesors, and a test for heterogeneity between these two study strata was not significant. Expand
The prognostic value of muscle StO2 in septic patients
TLDR
Altered recovery in StO2 after an ischemic challenge is frequent in septic patients and more pronounced in the presence of shock, and the presence and persistence of these alterations in the first 24 h of sepsis are associated with worse outcome. Expand
The "VIP" approach to the bedside management of shock.
There is little controversy regarding the dire clinical status of the patient who presents with prostration, hypotension, pallor, coldness, moisture of the skin, collapse of superficial veins,Expand
Comparison of dopamine and norepinephrine in the treatment of shock.
TLDR
Although there was no significant difference in the rate of death between patients with shock who were treated with dopamine as the first-line vasopressor agent and those who were treating with norepinephrine, the use of dopamine was associated with a greater number of adverse events. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...