Cigarette smoke silences innate lymphoid cell function and facilitates an exacerbated type I interleukin-33-dependent response to infection.

@article{Kearley2015CigaretteSS,
  title={Cigarette smoke silences innate lymphoid cell function and facilitates an exacerbated type I interleukin-33-dependent response to infection.},
  author={Jennifer Kearley and Jonathan S. Silver and Caroline Sand{\'e}n and Zheng Hui Liu and Aaron A. Berlin and Natalie A. White and Michiko Mori and Tuyet-Hang Pham and Christine K. Ward and Gerard J. Criner and Nathaniel Marchetti and Tomas M. Mustelin and Jonas Sten Erjefalt and Roland Kolbeck and Alison A. Humbles},
  journal={Immunity},
  year={2015},
  volume={42 3},
  pages={566-79}
}
Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is presumed to be central to the altered responsiveness to recurrent infection in these patients. We examined the effects of smoke priming underlying the exacerbated response to viral infection in mice. Lack of interleukin-33 (IL-33) signaling conferred complete protection during exacerbation and prevented enhanced inflammation and exaggerated weight loss. Mechanistically, smoke was required to upregulate… CONTINUE READING
Recent Discussions
This paper has been referenced on Twitter 11 times over the past 90 days. VIEW TWEETS
49 Citations
57 References
Similar Papers

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 49 extracted citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 57 references

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…