Chytrid fungi and global amphibian declines

@article{Fisher2020ChytridFA,
  title={Chytrid fungi and global amphibian declines},
  author={M. Fisher and T. Garner},
  journal={Nature Reviews Microbiology},
  year={2020},
  volume={18},
  pages={332-343}
}
Discovering that chytrid fungi cause chytridiomycosis in amphibians represented a paradigm shift in our understanding of how emerging infectious diseases contribute to global patterns of biodiversity loss. In this Review we describe how the use of multidisciplinary biological approaches has been essential to pinpointing the origins of amphibian-parasitizing chytrid fungi, including Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans , as well as to timing their emergence… Expand

Paper Mentions

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Modelling the amphibian chytrid fungus spread by connectivity analysis: towards a national monitoring network in Italy
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Single infection with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis or Ranavirus does not increase probability of co-infection in a montane community of amphibians
TLDR
The occurrence of infection of the amphibian chytrid fungus and ranaviruses during one season in two susceptible amphibian species at two different locations at which outbreaks have occurred is analyzed and it is found that single infections are the most common situation. Expand
Early presence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Mexico with a contemporary dominance of the global panzootic lineage
TLDR
A contemporary dominance of the global panzootic lineage in Mexico is observed and four genetic subpopulations and potential for admixture among these populations are reported, with a clear geographic signature or support for the epizootic wave hypothesis. Expand
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