Chronotherapeutic efficacy of suvorexant on sleep quality and metabolic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes and insomnia.

@article{Yoshikawa2020ChronotherapeuticEO,
  title={Chronotherapeutic efficacy of suvorexant on sleep quality and metabolic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes and insomnia.},
  author={Fukumi Yoshikawa and Fumika Shigiyama and Yasuyo Ando and Masahiko Miyagi and Hiroshi Uchino and Takahisa Hirose and Naoki Kumashiro},
  journal={Diabetes research and clinical practice},
  year={2020},
  pages={
          108412
        }
}
4 Citations

Sleep disorders in people with type 2 diabetes and associated health outcomes: a review of the literature

TLDR
It is concluded that sleep disorders are highly prevalent in people with type 2 diabetes, negatively affecting health outcomes and efforts should be made to diagnose and treat sleep disorders in kind 2 diabetes in order to ultimately improve health and therefore quality of life.

A Growing Link between Circadian Rhythms, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Alzheimer’s Disease

TLDR
The relationship among circadian rhythm disruption, T2DM and AD, is reviewed, and it is suggested that the occurrence and progression of T2 DM and AD may in part be associated with circadian disruption.

Chronotherapy of cardiovascular pathologies: a hopeful strategy

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