Chronological and Isotopic data support a revision for the timing of cave bear extinction in Mediterranean Europe

@article{Terlato2019ChronologicalAI,
  title={Chronological and Isotopic data support a revision for the timing of cave bear extinction in Mediterranean Europe},
  author={Gabriele Terlato and Herv{\'e} Bocherens and Matteo Romandini and Nicola Nannini and Keith A. Hobson and Marco Peresani},
  journal={Historical Biology},
  year={2019},
  volume={31},
  pages={474 - 484}
}
Abstract The Cave Bear, Ursus spelaeus (sensu lato), was one of many megafaunal species that became extinct during the Late Pleistocene in Europe. With new data we revisit the debate about the extinction and paleoecology of this species by presenting new chronometric, isotopic and taphonomic evidence from two Palaeolithic cave bear sites in northeastern Italy: Paina Cave and Trene Cave. Two direct radiocarbon dates on well-preserved collagen have yielded ages around 24,200–23,500 cal yr BP… 

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