Chronic systemic D‐galactose exposure induces memory loss, neurodegeneration, and oxidative damage in mice: Protective effects of R‐α‐lipoic acid

@article{Cui2006ChronicSD,
  title={Chronic systemic D‐galactose exposure induces memory loss, neurodegeneration, and oxidative damage in mice: Protective effects of R‐$\alpha$‐lipoic acid},
  author={Xu Cui and Ping-Ping Zuo and Qing Zhang and Xue-kun Li and Ya-zhuo Hu and Jiangang Long and Lester Packer and Jiankang Liu},
  journal={Journal of Neuroscience Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={84}
}
Chronic systemic exposure of mice, rats, and Drosophila to D‐galactose causes the acceleration of senescence and has been used as an aging model. The underlying mechanism is yet unclear. To investigate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in this model, we studied cognitive function, hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and neurogenesis, and peripheral oxidative stress biomarkers, and also the protective effects of the antioxidant R‐alpha‐lipoic acid. Chronic systemic exposure of D‐galactose (100 mg… 
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