Chronic suppurative otitis media in the Solomon Islands: a prospective, microbiological, audiometric and therapeutic survey.

Abstract

Chronic suppurative otitis media affected 3.8% of 3500 Solomon Island children under 15 years (and 6.1% under 5 years) and was the sole cause of conductive hearing loss recorded in 265 children tested audiometrically. It was characterised by early onset (65% under 18 months) male preponderance and large central tubotympanic perforations. Measles, respiratory infections, swimming and malnutrition were identified as aetiological factors amenable to intervention. Proteus and pseudomonas were the principle aerobes isolated from ear pus and gentamicin the only antibiotic tested to be effective against them. However although a prospective therapeutic trial demonstrated a significantly improved outcome after aural toilet, no additional benefit was imparted by concurrent ototopical boric acid or aminoglycoside solution or oral antianaerobic clindamycin. Parental tuition in aural cleaning, avoidance of ear water entry, nose blowing and breathing will yield a good result in up to 60% of children in half of whom tympanic healing occurred.

Statistics

0102030'04'06'08'10'12'14'16
Citations per Year

63 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 63 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Eason1986ChronicSO, title={Chronic suppurative otitis media in the Solomon Islands: a prospective, microbiological, audiometric and therapeutic survey.}, author={Rowena J. Eason and Erika Harding and Ross Nicholson and Denise M. Nicholson and James Son G. Pada and Jeremy S Gathercole}, journal={The New Zealand medical journal}, year={1986}, volume={99 812}, pages={812-5} }