Chronic morphine exposure alters the dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons in visual cortex of rats

@article{Li2007ChronicME,
  title={Chronic morphine exposure alters the dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons in visual cortex of rats},
  author={Yan-Fang Li and Hao Wang and Lei Niu and Yifeng Zhou},
  journal={Neuroscience Letters},
  year={2007},
  volume={418},
  pages={227-231}
}

Figures from this paper

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