Chronic malaria infections increase family inequalities and reduce parental fitness: experimental evidence from a wild bird population.

@article{Knowles2010ChronicMI,
  title={Chronic malaria infections increase family inequalities and reduce parental fitness: experimental evidence from a wild bird population.},
  author={Sarah C L Knowles and Vaidas Palinauskas and Ben C Sheldon},
  journal={Journal of evolutionary biology},
  year={2010},
  volume={23 3},
  pages={557-69}
}
Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium) occur commonly in wild birds and are an increasingly popular model system for understanding host-parasite co-evolution. However, whether these parasites have fitness consequences for hosts in endemic areas is much debated, particularly since wild-caught individuals almost always harbour chronic infections of very low parasite density. We used the anti-malarial drug Malarone to test experimentally for fitness effects of chronic malaria infection in a wild… CONTINUE READING