Chronic diseases and risk for depression in old age: A meta-analysis of published literature

@article{Huang2010ChronicDA,
  title={Chronic diseases and risk for depression in old age: A meta-analysis of published literature},
  author={Chang-quan Huang and Bi Rong Dong and Zhenchan Lu and Jirong Yue and Qing-Xiu Liu},
  journal={Ageing Research Reviews},
  year={2010},
  volume={9},
  pages={131-141}
}
OBJECTIVE We assessed the relationship between chronic diseases and risk for depression in old age. METHOD MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library database were used to identify potential studies. All of the clinical studies that obtained data on the association between chronic diseases and risk of depression among individuals aged 55 years or older were identified and included in this review. The studies were classified into cross-sectional and longitudinal subsets. The quantitative meta… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
Depression significantly increased the risk of development of stroke, and this increase was probably independent of other risk factors, including hypertension and diabetes.
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We aim to examine the relationship between diabetes and depression risk in longitudinal cohort studies and by how much the incidence of depression in a population would be reduced if diabetes was
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TLDR
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Vascular Risk Factors and Depression in Later Life: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
TLDR
Convincing evidence is found of a strong relationship between key diseases and depression and between composite vascular risk and depression but not between some vascular risk factors (hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia) and depression.
Hearing Loss and Depression in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
TLDR
Hearing loss was associated with statistically significantly greater odds of depression in older adults and there was no effect of moderator variables on the association between hearing loss and depression, but these findings must be interpreted with caution.
Systematic Review: The Association between Late Life Depression and Hypotension.
TLDR
This systematic review found that cross-sectional studies demonstrated a consistent relationship between hypotension and LLD, but longitudinal data to date is less consistent, with discordant findings.
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