Chronic aluminum intake causes Alzheimer's disease: applying Sir Austin Bradford Hill's causality criteria.

@article{Walton2014ChronicAI,
  title={Chronic aluminum intake causes Alzheimer's disease: applying Sir Austin Bradford Hill's causality criteria.},
  author={Judie R. Walton},
  journal={Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD},
  year={2014},
  volume={40 4},
  pages={
          765-838
        }
}
  • J. Walton
  • Published 2014
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
Industrialized societies produce many convenience foods with aluminum additives that enhance various food properties and use alum (aluminum sulfate or aluminum potassium sulfate) in water treatment to enable delivery of large volumes of drinking water to millions of urban consumers. The present causality analysis evaluates the extent to which the routine, life-long intake, and metabolism of aluminum compounds can account for Alzheimer's disease (AD), using Austin Bradford Hill's nine… Expand
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